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List of standards organizations

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A Labautopedia compendium of standards organizations related to laboratory automation. Click on linked terms for more detail. Refer to the Contributing section for author information.

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Standards(6 P)
The Market Place for Lab Automation & Screening  The Market Place

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  • American National Standards Institute (ANSI): The Institute oversees the creation, promulgation and use of thousands of norms and guidelines that directly impact businesses in nearly every sector: from acoustical devices to construction equipment, from dairy and livestock production to energy distribution, and many more. ANSI is also actively engaged in accrediting programs that assess conformance to standards – including globally-recognized cross-sector programs such as the ISO 9000 (quality) and ISO 14000 (environmental) management systems
  • ASTM International: Originally known as the American Society for Testing and Materials, is one of the largest voluntary standards development organizations in the world-a trusted source for technical standards for materials, products, systems, and services. The AnIML data standard is one example.


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  • The Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI): A global, nonprofit, standards-developing organization that promotes the development and use of voluntary consensus standards and guidelines within the health care community.  Formerly the NCCLS (National Committee on Clinical Laboratory Standards). 
     

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  • European Committee for Standardization (CEN): The Comité Européen de Normalisation (CEN), is a private non-profit organisation whose mission is to foster the European economy in global trading, the welfare of European citizens and the environment by providing an efficient infrastructure to interested parties for the development, maintenance and distribution of coherent sets of standards and specifications.  CEN was founded in 1961. Its thirty national members work together to develop European Standards (ENs) in various sectors to build a European internal market for goods and services and to position Europe in the global economy. Some of these standards are voluntary, whereas other standards such as harmonized standards have been made effectively mandatory under EU law.
  • European Committee for Electrotechnical Standardization (CENELEC): The Comité Européen de Normalisation Electrotechnique (CENELEC) is responsible for European Standardization in the area of electrical engineering. Together with ETSI (telecommunication) and CEN (other technical areas) CENELEC form the European system for technical standardization.  Standards harmonised by these agencies are regularly adopted in many countries outside Europe which follow European technical standards.  CENELEC was founded in 1973. Before that two organizations were responsible for electrotechnical standardization: CENELCOM and CENEL. CENELEC is a non-profit organization under Belgian law, based in Brussels. The members are the national electrotechnical standardization bodies of most European countries.  Although CENELEC works closely with the European Union, it is not an EU institution.
  • European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI): Produces globally-applicable standards for Information and Communications Technologies (ICT), including fixed, mobile, radio, converged, broadcast and internet technologies.  We are officially recognized by the European Commission as a European Standards Organization. The high quality of our work and our open approach to standardization has helped us evolve into a European roots - global branches operation with a solid reputation for technical excellence.  ETSI is a not-for-profit organization with almost 700 ETSI member organizations drawn from 60 countries world-wide.

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  • Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM): Located in Geel, Belgium, is one of the seven institutes of the Joint Research Centre (JRC), a Directorate-General of the European Commission (EC). The IRMM promotes a common and reliable European measurement system in support of European Union policies. The institute works on the production and dissemination of quality assurance tools, such as validated methods, reference materials, reference measurements, interlaboratory comparisons and training in best practices and experience in all areas where IRMM is working. The IRMM has six core areas of competence:Reference materials; Food analysis; Bioanalysis; Chemical reference measurements; Radionuclide metrology & Neutron physics
  • International Organization for Standardization (ISO): ISO is the world's largest developer and publisher of International Standards.  ISO is a network of the national standards institutes of 157 countries, one member per country, with a Central Secretariat in Geneva, Switzerland, that coordinates the system.  ISO is a non-governmental organization that forms a bridge between the public and private sectors. On the one hand, many of its member institutes are part of the governmental structure of their countries, or are mandated by their government. On the other hand, other members have their roots uniquely in the private sector, having been set up by national partnerships of industry associations.  Therefore, ISO enables a consensus to be reached on solutions that meet both the requirements of business and the broader needs of society.

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  • Microplate Standards - ANSI/Society of Biomolecular Sciences

Since SBS is not a standardizing association, but an association that provides Special Interest Groups the ability and platform to standardize along with ANSI (the American National Standards Institute), in the event that the ANSI/SBS Microplate Standards are to be used in advertisements, product releases, or abstracts, the standards must be referred by:


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  • National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST): The National Institute of Standards and Technology develops technologies, measurement methods and standards that help U.S. companies compete in the global marketplace. Congress created NIST in 1901 at the start of the industrial revolution to provide the measurement and standards needed to resolve and prevent disputes over trade and to encourage standardization.  Today NIST continues to develop measurements and standards needed by industry, and also develops technologies that help our nation remain prosperous
  • NCCLS: See CLSI

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